Vitamin c deficiency

Vitamin c deficiency

Vitamin C deficiency: 15 signs that do not deceive

Vitamin C is an essential vitamin that must be consumed regularly to prevent deficiencies.

While deficiency is less in developed countries because of availability of fresh produce and the addition of vitamin C to certain foods and supplements, it still affects about 7% of American adults and slightly less for European adults.

The most common risk factors for vitamin C deficiency are poor nutrition, alcoholism, anorexia, severe mental illness, smoking, and dialysis.

While symptoms of severe vitamin C deficiency may take months to develop, there are some subtle signs to watch for.

Here are the 15 common symptoms of vitamin C deficiency.

1 – Dry skin
Vitamin C plays a key role in the production of collagen, an abundant protein in connective tissues such as skin, hair, joints, bones and blood vessels.

When vitamin C is low, a skin condition known as keratosis pilaris can occur.

Under these conditions, the skin can become dry and rough at the back of the arms, thighs or buttocks due to an accumulation of keratin proteins inside the pores.

Hair keratosis caused by vitamin C deficiency usually occurs after three to five months of inadequate consumption and resolves with supplementation.

However, there are many other potential causes of keratosis pilaris, so its mere presence is not sufficient to diagnose a deficiency.

2 – Corkscrew shaped bristles
Vitamin C deficiency can also cause hair growth with curved or coiled shapes due to defects that develop in the protein structure of the hairs as they develop.

The corkscrew hairs are one of the hallmarks of vitamin C deficiency, but they may not be obvious because these damaged hairs are more likely to break or fall off.

Capillary abnormalities often disappear within one month after treatment with adequate amounts of vitamin C.
3 – Redness in the scalp and areas where hair grows
The hair follicles on the surface of the skin contain many small blood vessels that supply blood and nutrients to the area.

When the body less level of vitamin C, these small blood vessels become brittle and break easily, causing small, bright red spots around the hair follicles.

This is a well-recognized sign of severe vitamin C deficiency.

Taking vitamin C supplements usually resolves this symptom within two weeks.

4 – Spoon shaped nails with spots
The spoon-shaped nails are characterized by their concave shape, often thin and brittle.

They are more often associated with iron deficiency anemia but have also been associated with vitamin C deficiency.

Red spots or vertical lines in the nail, known as disseminated hemorrhage, may also appear during vitamin C deficiency due to weak blood vessels that break easily.

Although the visual appearance of the nails can help determine the likelihood of vitamin C deficiency, note that this is not considered a diagnosis.

5 – Films and buttons
Healthy skin contains large amounts of vitamin C, especially in the epidermis or in the outer layer of the skin.

Vitamin C maintains healthy skin by protecting it from oxidative damage caused by the sun and exposure to pollutants such as cigarette smoke or ozone.

It also promotes collagen production, which keeps skin firm and youthful.

High vitamin C intakes are associated with better skin quality, while lower intakes are associated with an increased risk of dandruff and pimples.

These effects can also be caused by many other factors, so these symptoms alone are not sufficient to diagnose vitamin C deficiency.

6 – Bruising
Bruising occurs when the blood vessels under the skin break, causing blood to leak into the surrounding areas.

Bruising is a common sign of vitamin C deficiency, as poor collagen production causes weak blood vessels.

Deficiency bruises can cover large areas of the body or appear as small purple dots under the skin.

Bruising is often one of the first obvious symptoms of vitamin C deficiency.

7 – slow healing of wounds
As vitamin C deficiency slows collagen formation, wounds heal more slowly.

Research has shown that people with chronic leg ulcers who do not heal are significantly more likely to have vitamin C deficiency than those who do not have chronic leg ulcers.

In severe cases of deficiency, old wounds even reopen, increasing the risk for infection.

Slow healing of wounds is one of the most advanced signs of deficiency and is usually not observed until someone is deficient for many months.

8 – Painful and swollen joints
The joints contain a lot of collagen rich tissues, so they can also be affected by vitamin C deficiency.

Many cases of joint pain associated with vitamin C deficiency have been reported, often serious enough to cause difficulty walking.

Bleeding in the joints can also occur in people who have vitamin C deficiency, causing swelling and extra pain.

Both of these symptoms can be treated with vitamin C supplements and usually resolve in a week.

9 – Fragile bones
Vitamin C deficiency can also affect bone health. Low consumption has been associated with an increased risk of fracture and osteoporosis.

Children’s bones can be particularly affected by vitamin C deficiency because they are still growing and developing.
10 – bleeding gums
Red, swollen and bleeding gums are another common sign of vitamin C deficiency.

Without vitamin C, the gingival tissue weakens, becomes inflamed and the blood vessels bleed more easily.

In the advanced stages of vitamin C deficiency, the gums can even become purple and rotten.

Teeth can also fall in case of serious deficiency.

11 – weakened immune system
Studies show that vitamin C accumulates in various types of immune cells to help fight infection and destroy pathogens.

Vitamin C deficiency is associated with poor immunity and a higher risk of infection, including serious diseases such as pneumonia.

12 – Iron deficiency anemia (iron deficiency)
Vitamin C and iron deficiency anemia mostly occur together in most of cases.

Signs of iron deficiency anemia include pallor, fatigue, difficulty breathing during exercise, dryness of skin and hair, headaches, and spoon-like nails.

Low levels of vitamin C can contribute to iron deficiency anemia by reducing the absorption of iron from plant foods and negatively affecting iron metabolism.

Vitamin C deficiency increases the risk of excessive bleeding, which may lead to anemia.

If iron deficiency anemia persists for a long time without obvious cause, it may be wise to check your vitamin C.

13 – Fatigue and bad mood
Two of the first signs of vitamin C deficiency are fatigue and bad mood.

These symptoms may appear even before a complete deficiency develops.

Although fatigue and irritability may be among the first symptoms to appear, they usually disappear after only a few days of adequate vitamin C intake or within 24 hours of high-dose supplementation.

14 – Unexplained weight gain
Vitamin C can help protect against obesity by regulating the release of fat from fat cells, reducing stress hormones and decreasing inflammation.

It is interesting to note that low blood levels of vitamin C have been associated with higher rates of abdominal fat.

Although excess body fat is not enough to indicate vitamin C deficiency, it may be worthwhile to look at it.
15 – Chronic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress
Vitamin C is most important water-soluble antioxidant.

It helps prevent cell damage by neutralizing free radicals that can cause oxidative stress and inflammation in the body.

Oxidative stress and inflammation can be the cause of many chronic diseases, including heart disease and diabetes.

Low vitamin C intakes have been associated with higher levels of inflammation and oxidative stress.

One study found that adults with the lowest blood levels of vitamin C were nearly 40% more likely to develop heart failure in the next 15 years than those with the highest blood levels, even if they did not lacked vitamin C.

The best foods for vitamin C
The recommended daily intake for vitamin C is 90 mg for men and 75 mg for women.

It is advisable for smokers to consume 35 mg more per day because tobacco reduces the absorption of vitamin C.

Here are the best foods for vitamin C (per 100 grams):

Cherry of Acerola: 1677 mg
Guava: 228.3 mg
Cassis: 181 mg
Parsley: 133 mg
Kiwi fruit: 92.7 mg
Broccoli: 89.2 mg
Red pepper: 84 mg
Lychee: 71.5 mg
Strawberry: 67.4 mg
Papaya: 60.9 mg
Lemon: 53.4 mg
Orange: 53.2 mg
Vitamin C breaks down quickly when exposed to heat, so raw fruits and vegetables are better sources than cooked fruits.

Since the body does not store vitamin C much, it is recommended to eat fresh fruits and vegetables often.

Vitamin C supplementation was not considered toxic, but taking more than 2000 mg daily can cause abdominal cramps, diarrhea, nausea, and increase the risk of developing oxalate kidney stones in men.

Conclusion
Since humans can not make vitamin C or store it in large quantities, it must be consumed regularly to prevent deficiencies, ideally through fresh fruits and vegetables.

There are many signs and symptoms of deficiency, most of which are related to alterations in collagen production or lack of antioxidants.

Some of the first signs of deficiency include fatigue, red gums, bruising, bleeding, joint pain and dry skin.

As deficiency progresses, bones can become brittle, deformities of the nails and hair can develop, wounds can take longer to heal and the immune system suffers.
Fortunately, deficiency symptoms are usually resolved once vitamin C levels are restored.

9 – Fragile bones
Vitamin C deficiency can also affect bone health. Low consumption has been associated with an increased risk of fracture and osteoporosis.

Children’s bones can be particularly affected by vitamin C deficiency because they are still growing and developing.
10 – bleeding gums
Red, swollen and bleeding gums are another common sign of vitamin C deficiency.

Without vitamin C, the gingival tissue weakens, becomes inflamed and the blood vessels bleed more easily.

In the advanced stages of vitamin C deficiency, the gums can even become purple and rotten.

Teeth can also fall in case of serious deficiency.

11 – weakened immune system
Studies show that vitamin C accumulates in various types of immune cells to help fight infection and destroy pathogens.

Vitamin C deficiency is associated with poor immunity and a higher risk of infection, including serious diseases such as pneumonia.

12 – Iron deficiency anemia (iron deficiency)
Vitamin C and iron deficiency anemia mostly occur together in most of cases.

Signs of iron deficiency anemia include pallor, fatigue, difficulty breathing during exercise, dryness of skin and hair, headaches, and spoon-like nails.

Low levels of vitamin C can contribute to iron deficiency anemia by reducing the absorption of iron from plant foods and negatively affecting iron metabolism.

Vitamin C deficiency increases the risk of excessive bleeding, which may lead to anemia.

If iron deficiency anemia persists for a long time without obvious cause, it may be wise to check your vitamin C.

13 – Fatigue and bad mood
Two of the first signs of vitamin C deficiency are fatigue and bad mood.

These symptoms may appear even before a complete deficiency develops.

Although fatigue and irritability may be among the first symptoms to appear, they usually disappear after only a few days of adequate vitamin C intake or within 24 hours of high-dose supplementation.

14 – Unexplained weight gain
Vitamin C can help protect against obesity by regulating the release of fat from fat cells, reducing stress hormones and decreasing inflammation.

It is interesting to note that low blood levels of vitamin C have been associated with higher rates of abdominal fat.

Although excess body fat is not enough to indicate vitamin C deficiency, it may be worthwhile to look at it.
15 – Chronic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress
Vitamin C is most important water-soluble antioxidant.

It helps prevent cell damage by neutralizing free radicals that can cause oxidative stress and inflammation in the body.

Oxidative stress and inflammation can be the cause of many chronic diseases, including heart disease and diabetes.

Low vitamin C intakes have been associated with higher levels of inflammation and oxidative stress.

One study found that adults with the lowest blood levels of vitamin C were nearly 40% more likely to develop heart failure in the next 15 years than those with the highest blood levels, even if they did not lacked vitamin C.

The best foods for vitamin C
The recommended daily intake for vitamin C is 90 mg for men and 75 mg for women.

It is advisable for smokers to consume 35 mg more per day because tobacco reduces the absorption of vitamin C.

Here are the best foods for vitamin C (per 100 grams):

Cherry of Acerola: 1677 mg
Guava: 228.3 mg
Cassis: 181 mg
Parsley: 133 mg
Kiwi fruit: 92.7 mg
Broccoli: 89.2 mg
Red pepper: 84 mg
Lychee: 71.5 mg
Strawberry: 67.4 mg
Papaya: 60.9 mg
Lemon: 53.4 mg
Orange: 53.2 mg
Vitamin C breaks down quickly when exposed to heat, so raw fruits and vegetables are better sources than cooked fruits.

Since the body does not store vitamin C much, it is recommended to eat fresh fruits and vegetables often.

Vitamin C supplementation was not considered toxic, but taking more than 2000 mg daily can cause abdominal cramps, diarrhea, nausea, and increase the risk of developing oxalate kidney stones in men.

Conclusion
Since humans can not make vitamin C or store it in large quantities, it must be consumed regularly to prevent deficiencies, ideally through fresh fruits and vegetables.

There are many signs and symptoms of deficiency, most of which are related to alterations in collagen production or lack of antioxidants.

Some of the first signs of deficiency include fatigue, red gums, bruising, bleeding, joint pain and dry skin.

As deficiency progresses, bones can become brittle, deformities of the nails and hair can develop, wounds can take longer to heal and the immune system suffers.
Fortunately, deficiency symptoms are usually resolved once vitamin C levels are restored.

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